The 20 Questions Book Tag

Hi everybody! I hope you’re having a lovely week so far! 😊

As you most likely saw from the title of this post, I’m here with the 20 Questions Book Tag! I found this on Suhani’s blog, Random Reader’s Rambles, a while ago. She left an open nomination, and I thought it looked fun, so I’m finally here doing this tag! πŸ˜„


1: How many books is too many for a series?

I think that if an author writes more than four or five books in a series, the series can get kind of boring as they run out of ideas. I’m not saying that that’s how it is with every longer series, but I think that that’s how it goes with a lot of the books I’ve read that are longer than four books.

2: How do you feel about cliffhangers?

I love them…but I also don’t! πŸ˜†

3: Hardcover or paperback?

I like both, but generally, I enjoy reading hardcover books better, because they are more durable, and they look prettier!

4: Favorite book?

What! How does anybody expect a reader to answer that?? There are so many…I’ll have to choose one from each genre! 🀣 Contemporary: uhhh…(this is already too hard!) probably one of Kasie West’s books! My favorite is either P.S. I Like You or By Your Side! Dystopian: no other dystopian can compare to The Hunger Games. Fantasy: probably An Ember in the Ashes series, or the Lord of the Rings series, which I just finished, after working on the series for a year. Both of those series are amazing! Historical fiction: Lovely War by Julie Berry, or any Ruta Sepetys book I’ve read!

5: Least favorite book?

I don’t really have a least favorite book. Most of my reads are pretty good!

6: Love triangles, yes or no?

Only if they are well-written. A lot of the love triangles I read are so annoying!

7: The most recent book you couldn’t finish?

I haven’t DNF’d any books recently. I always try to finish them once I start.

8: A book you’re currently reading?

I’m reading The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien! My brother and I are both reading it at the same time!

9: Last book you recommended to someone?

Uhh…I don’t really remember. I guess The Fountains of Silence by Ruta Sepetys, which I finished very recently! I recommended it to my sister, and to all of you guys in my spoiler-free book review I posted!

10: Oldest book you’ve read by publication date?

I’m not sure, but some of the Jane Austen books are pretty old. I really like her books! I’ve read Pride and Prejudice and Emma.

11: Newest book you’ve read by publication date?

I’m not really sure. I don’t feel like going through the books I’ve read and researching their publication dates right now, lol. πŸ˜„

12: Favorite author?

As I mentioned, Kasie West’s books are amazing! I think that they are such cute, fluffy, quick, contemporary novels! They are also really clean, which I appreciate! Ruta Sepetys is also an author whose books I love! I’ve read Between Shades of Gray, Salt to the Sea, and The Fountain of Silence. I am hoping to get her newest book, I Must Betray You, next time I go to the library!

13: Buying books or borrowing books?

I like to buy them better! When I borrow books, I always worry I’m going to ruin them somehow.

14: A book you dislike that everyone seems to love?

Maybe Sarah Dessen’s novels. They’re just not my faves. The Truth About Forever was okay, but I found the main character kind of annoying. The other books of hers I didn’t enjoy a lot either.

15: Bookmarks or dogears?

I usually use bookmarks, however (unlike my sister) I’m not totally against dogearing pages in books, and I occasionally do dogear pages in the book I’m reading if it’s my book!

16: A book you can always re-read?

The Hunger Games is a book that I can re-read over and over again (I actually just recently re-read it). I feel like I get something new out of it each time. What’s your favorite book in the series?

17: Can you read while listening to music?

I can, but I just don’t like it too much. I do have a lot of noisy siblings, and, I’m usually surrounded by noise when reading, so I’ve kind of adapted to reading with noise around.

18: One POV or multiple?

Like with the love triangle question, I like multiple points of view if they’re done well. A lot of the time, I forget who’s narrating with multiple points of view.

19: Do you read a book in one sitting or over multiple days?

Multiple days. (Unless it’s a Kasie West book! 😁)

20: Who do you tag?

I’ll tag BetsyJane, Diamond, Isabelle, and Victoria! If any of y’all have already done this tag, or if you don’t want to do it, sorry! I just think that this is a really fun tag!


Thanks for reading, everyone! How would you have answered these questions? What’s your favorite book? (If you can choose one, lol!) Who’s your favorite author? What are your thoughts on bookmarks and dogears? I’d love to chat in the comments!

I’ll see all of you on Monday! Have a good rest of your week and a fun weekend! ❀

~ Rebekah

Advertisement

The Fountains of Silence by Ruta Sepetys: Book Review

Hello everybody! Welcome, or welcome back to my blog!

Today, I’m sharing a book review from the amazing Ruta Sepetys who has, once again, blown me away with her novel. The Fountains of Silence is an interesting and moving story set in a time I seldom hear about: Spain in the 1950s.

I enjoyed two other books by this author: Salt to the Sea and Between Shades of Gray. I find this book very similar, in the writing and the progression of the story, especially to Salt to the Sea. I hope to read her latest release soon, I Must Betray You.

Without further ado, here’s the spoiler free book review.

The Fountains of Silence by Ruta Sepetys

Summary from Goodreads

A portrait of love, silence, and secrets under a Spanish dictatorship.

Madrid, 1957. Under the fascist dictatorship of General Francisco Franco, Spain is hiding a dark secret. Meanwhile, tourists and foreign businessmen flood into Spain under the welcoming promise of sunshine and wine. Among them is eighteen-year-old Daniel Matheson, the son of an oil tycoon, who arrives in Madrid with his parents hoping to connect with the country of his mother’s birth through the lens of his camera. Photography–and fate–introduce him to Ana, whose family’s interweaving obstacles reveal the lingering grasp of the Spanish Civil War–as well as chilling definitions of fortune and fear. Daniel’s photographs leave him with uncomfortable questions amidst shadows of danger. He is backed into a corner of difficult decisions to protect those he loves. Lives and hearts collide, revealing an incredibly dark side to the sunny Spanish city.

My thoughts on the book

Characters

I love the characters that Ruta Sepetys writes. They feel so real, with their own hopes and dream, fears and stories.

Ana and Daniel are the two main characters, and I loved them both. Ana’s courageousness and her devotion to her family, and Daniel’s caring attitude and dedication were some of my favorite traits of theirs. I also loved reading about the friendship and romance blooming between these two characters.

There is a long string of other characters, including Rafa, Ana’s brother, Julia, Ana’s protective older sister, Fuga, Rafa’s friend who won’t put up with injustice in Spain, Puri, Ana’s inquisitive cousin, and other characters, who shape this story into a powerful and heartbreaking tale about silence, love, family, and secrets, as the Goodreads summary states.

One thing that I didn’t like at the beginning was the number of characters the book follows. It’s told in the third person, but each chapter skips around to include the whole cast of characters in the narrative. At the beginning of the novel, I found it difficult to keep track of who was who, but after the first few chapters, I got to know who the characters were, and who the chapter was following.

Plot and setting

The plot and setting of this book were very interesting. The book slowly weaves together into an unforgettable story, which is driven by the amazing characters.

One thing I like about all the Ruta Sepetys books I’ve read so far is that she writes very well-researched books about little-known times in history. I knew almost nothing about 1950s Spain under Franco’s dictatorship before reading this book, which gave me a lot of insight into this historical time.

Throughout the story, the reader learns more. This book, similar to Sepetys’ other books, slowly tells the story in a secretive way, giving off tidbits of information throughout the book, until we have a full understanding of the story at the end. What I’m trying to say is that you don’t know all of the facts as the books go on. There will be some parts where you’re wondering: What is that character keeping from me? This aspect, I find very similar to Salt to the Sea.

Another thing about the plot is that it’s very character-driven, which I’m totally fine with. Sepetys researched this historical period so well, too, that as you’re reading her book, you get a feel for what that time was really like. While reading about Ana’s family’s struggles, Daniel’s time in Madrid, and Puri’s descriptions of the orphanage, the reader really understands what life was like for people living in 1957 Spain.

Writing

Ruta Sepety’s writing style is very…I don’t know how to describe it. It’s not choppy, but I feel like her writing has shorter sentences, that really draws the reader in. This writing may not be for everyone, but I really enjoyed it.

Something that I found a little strange at first was the way the book was written. It was told in the third person and was present tense. This, I don’t find in many books and it took a little while to get used to, but it wasn’t too big of a problem.

Similar books, and who should read this book

This book is very similar to the other two Ruta Sepetys books I’ve read, which were Salt to the Sea and Between Shades of Gray. If you haven’t read either of those, and you loved this book, I’d recommend them to you. Or, if you’ve read these two books, but haven’t gotten around to The Fountains of Silence, I’d recommend you read this beautiful historical fiction.

One thing I’ll say is that this book is not for everyone. She has a certain writing style that not everyone enjoys. She doesn’t have choppy writing, but it’s written similarly to that: shorter, to-the-point sentences, like I mentioned earlier. I personally enjoy that narrative, but as I said, it’s not for everyone.

If you read this book, and you’re wanting to read a similar book, I’d first recommend any other Ruta Sepetys books. Lovely War by Julie Berry is another book I find similar to this one. It’s narrated very uniquely, and it tells the lovely story of two different romance stories during World War One. I was unsure about this book at first, but it was amazing and I really enjoyed it.

If you normally like historical fiction or mystery type stories, I’d recommend this book to you. It has a mysterious element to it, though it’s not a mystery, it has a bit of that, with a few plot twists, and twists at the ending. Besides that, it is an amazingly researched historical fiction.

Final thoughts

I loved this book if it isn’t clear from reading my review. There are a few things I didn’t enjoy about the novel, such as the many narrators, because it was hard to keep track of all of them at first, or the first person, present tense writing. Both of those, though, I eventually got used to. They aren’t real problems. I don’t have any real complaints about this book, which I found amazing. Despite being about five hundred pages, this book flew by quickly, because of the short two to three page chapters. It was, no doubt, a five star read for me!

Thank you for reading! Have you read this book, or any other Ruta Sepetys books? What were your thoughts about them? Or, is it on your TBR? Do you have any other historical fiction recs for me? I’d love to chat in the comments!

Bye, everyone! I’ll see you on Monday, next week! Please comment with your thoughts on this book review, or on the book, because I love chatting with y’all!

~ Rebekah

Some Bookish Phone Wallpapers

Hi everybody! Today, I’m sharing some bookish phone wallpapers I made on Canva! I’m sure that a lot of you have at least heard of Canva, but if you haven’t, it’s a website where you can create different designs. It’s where I make all of my featured images for each post I do!

If you want, you can absolutely use one of these wallpapers!

Thanks for reading today’s post! Which was your favorite? Would you like to see another post with summery wallpapers? I’d love to chat in the comments!

I hope you all have an amazing day! ☺

~ Rebekah

A Bookworm’s Life: A Poem

Hello! So, a while ago, when I first started my blog, I posted a poem called “A Bookworm’s Life” and it talks about the different emotions a reader feels while reading a book! And, because not many people were following me back when I posted it, I thought that I’d post it again!!

────── β™‘ ──────

They make you angry, they make you mad.

They make you happy, as well as sad.

They can make your heart whole, or break it in half.

Make you scream in rage, sob, and even laugh.

There are shocking betrayals and huge plot twists.

The moments that make you clench your fists.

But there are moments of joy, of true happiness.

Like when the main character and love interest finally kiss.

And then the pain that follows, when your favorite character dies.

After throwing the book, you just sit there and cry.

Then you turn the page, and you see it’s the last.

And you deeply regret having read it so fast.

Then you savor every word of this last scene.

And you slam the book shut, wanting to scream.

Because you can’t wait a whole year for the next part.

The sequel that’s guaranteed to break your heart.

────── β™‘ ──────

I’m definitely not an expert at writing poems, but I thought that this was a fun poem!

I hope you liked today’s post! πŸ’– Do you relate to the poem? I definitely do, as I wrote it based on my own experiences! 🀣

Thanks for reading, and have an amazing day and the rest of your weekend! See everyone on Wednesday!!!

~ Rebekah